Ordinary

Ordinary Requirements

1. Ideals

a. Explain the symbolism of the Sea Scout emblem.

b. Give a brief oral history of the U.S. flag.

c. Demonstrate how to fly, hoist, lower, fold, display and salute the U.S. flag. Explain flag etiquette and protocols for both land and sea.

d. Discuss with an adult leader how you live the Scout Oath and Law in your daily life.

2. Active Membership

a. Meet your ship's bylaws requirement for active participation in your ship's meetings and activities for three months.

b. Do one of the following. Recruit a new member for your ship and follow through until the new member is registered and formally admitted with an admissions ceremony, or assist in planning and carrying out a ship recruiting activity, such as an open house or joint activity with a youth group or organization (another Sea Scout ship will not count).

3. Leadership

a. Participate in the BSA's Introduction to Leadership Skills for Ships (ILSS) course.

b. Complete quarterdeck training, either as an officer or as a prospective officer.

c. Serve as an activity chair for a major ship event. Responsibilities should include planning, directing, and evaluating the event.

4. Swimming

Pass all requirements for the BSA’s Swimming merit badge.

5. Safety

a. Discuss BSA Safety Afloat with an adult leader or a Quartermaster candidate.

b. Describe the safety equipment required by law for your ship’s primary vessel.

c. Develop a ship’s station bill for your ship and review it with an adult leader.

d. Plan and practice the following drills: man overboard, fire, and abandon ship.

e. Describe three types of equipment used in marine communications.

f. Demonstrate your knowledge of correct maritime radio telephone communications procedures by making at least three calls to other vessels, marinas, bridges, or locks.

g. Galley

i) Before an activity, submit a menu that uses cooked and uncooked dishes, a list of provisions, and estimated costs for a day’s meal (breakfast, lunch, and dinner). Once the provision list is approved, help obtain the items on the list.

ii) Explain the use of charcoal, pressurized alcohol, and propane. Include safety precautions for each.

iii) Prepare breakfast, lunch, and dinner while on the activity. Demonstrate your ability to properly use the galley equipment or personal cooking gear generally used by your ship.

iv) Demonstrate appropriate sanitation techniques for food preparation and meal cleanup.

6. Marlinspike Seamanship

a. Name the various materials used to manufacture rope, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and the characteristics of laid and braided rope. Discuss the meaning of lay, thread, strand, and hawser. Explain how rope is sized and measured.

b. Using both large and small lines, tie and explain the use of the following knots: stevedore’s knot, French (double) bowline, bowline on a bight, timber hitch, rolling hitch, marline hitch, midshipman’s (taut-line) hitch, and trucker's hitch.

c. Demonstrate your ability to secure a line to pilings, cleats, and rings, and to coil, flake, and flemish a line.

d. Demonstrate how to cut and heat-seal a synthetic line and whip the end of plain-laid line using waxed cord or similar material.

7. Boat Handling

a. Name the principal parts of the masts, booms, spars, standing and running rigging, and sails of a gaff- or Marconi-rigged sloop, schooner, and ketch or yawl.

b. Demonstrate your ability to handle a vessel with paddles or oars by doing one of the following:

Safely board a rowboat and row in a straight line for 200 yards/meters, stop, make a pivot turn, return to the starting point, and backwater in a straight line for 50 yards/meters. Make a turn and return to the starting point.

or

Safely board a canoe, kayak, or paddleboard and paddle a straight line for 200 yards/meters. Make a turn and return to the starting point. Demonstrate a draw stroke to move the boat sideways both right and left, and forward and reverse sweeps to spin the boat both clockwise and counterclockwise.

8. Ground Tackle

a. Name the parts of a stock anchor and a stockless anchor.

b. Describe five types of anchors. Describe how each type holds the bottom, the kind of bottom in which it holds best, and the advantages or disadvantages of each type.

c. Calculate the amount of anchor rode necessary for your ship’s primary vessel in the following depths: 10, 20, and 30 feet in normal and storm conditions.

d. Demonstrate the ability to set and weigh anchor. 52 Advancement and Recognition

9. Navigation Rules

a. Explain the purpose of Navigation Rules, International and Inland.

b. Know the general “Rule of Responsibility.”

c. Define stand-on and give-way vessels for the following situations: meeting, crossing, and overtaking for both power and sailing vessels.

d. Explain “Responsibility Between Vessels” (vessel priority).

e. Explain the navigation lights required for power-driven and sailing vessels underway. Explain what is required for a vessel under oars. Describe the lighting requirements for paddlecraft. Explain why carrying a sound-producing device, such as a whistle, is important when operating a paddlecraft.

f. Describe the sound signals for maneuvering, warning, and restricted visibility.

10. Piloting and Navigation

a. Demonstrate your understanding of latitude and longitude. Using a chart, demonstrate that you can locate your position from given coordinates and determine the coordinates of at least five aids to navigation.

b. Explain the degree system of compass direction. Explain variation and deviation and how they are used to convert between true headings and bearings to compass headings and bearings.

c. Describe three kinds of devices used aboard ship for measuring speed and/or distance traveled and, if possible, demonstrate their use.

d. Explain the 24-hour time system and demonstrate that you can convert between 12- and 24-hour time.

e. Understand Coordinated Universal Time (Greenwich Mean Time or Zulu Time) and zone time. Demonstrate your ability to convert from one to the other for your local area.

f. Make a dead reckoning table of compass and distances (minimum three legs) between two points, plot these on a chart, and determine the final position. Note: Ideally this requirement should be met while underway. If this is not possible, it may be simulated using charts.

g. Discuss how a GPS unit works. Explain possible uses and functions including different screen views. Use a GPS unit to set a waypoint and navigate to the waypoint you have set.

11. Practical Deck Seamanship

a. Name the seven watches and explain bell time.

b. Explain the duties of a lookout and demonstrate how to report objects in view and wind directions with respect to the vessel.

c. Name relative bearings expressed in degrees.

d. While underway, serve as a lookout for two hours total. When boating in a manually propelled craft, boating alone or as a bow paddler for a tandem craft will meet this requirement.

e. Demonstrate the use of wheel or helm commands found in the Sea Scout Manual.

f. Describe the deck log kept aboard your ship’s principal craft. Contribute to a cruise log for three days of cruising (one cruise or a combination of day cruises). Submit the logs to your Skipper.

12. Environment

a. Discuss with an adult leader the Federal Water Pollution Control Act as related to oil discharges. Explain what a “Discharge of Oil Prohibited” placard is and if applicable find it aboard your ship’s vessels.

b. Explain what aquatic nuisance species are and how you can help stop their spread.

13. Weather

Read and understand a local weather bulletin. Know how to obtain current marine and weather reports from the National Weather Service in your area by telephone or radio, or online.

14. Cruising

a. Plan and participate in an overnight cruise.

b. While on the cruise, perform the duties of a helmsman for at least 30 minutes. If underway in a paddlecraft, paddling independently or as a stern paddler/ steersman will meet this requirement.

15. Boating Safety Course

Successfully complete a boating safety course approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) offered by one of the following agencies: a state boating agency, the United States Power Squadrons, the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, or other private or military education courses.

16. Service

a. Log at least eight hours of work on ship equipment, projects, or activities other than ship meetings, parties, dances, or fun events.

b. Participate with your ship for at least eight hours in community service projects.

17. Electives

Choose any three electives from the options listed following the Quartermaster rank requirements. Able 1. Ideals

Ordinary 1a. Explain the symbolism of the Sea Scout emblem.



Ordinary 1b. Give a brief oral history of the U.S. flag.



Ordinary 1c. Demonstrate how to fly, hoist, lower, fold, display and salute the U.S. flag. Explain flag etiquette and protocols for both land and sea.



Ordinary 1d. Discuss with an adult leader how you live the Scout Oath and Law in your daily life.



Ordinary 3a. ILSS

Ordinary 5a. Float Plan

#FloatPlan. Besides it is useful in Ordinary 5a. and Quartermaster 3c. requirements. ==> " Great article in the current edition of BoatUS magazine regarding the use of float plans. I highly encourage our Sea Scouts and families who use boats to review this article and download the included float plan for use during your boating activities. Stay safe!

https://www.boatus.com/expert-advice/expert-advice-archive/2020/june/why-you-should-use-a-float-plan "

ORD SAFETY 5.c, Station Bill, 5.d Planning for Drills.pptx

Ordinary 5c. Ship’s station bill for your ship.

Develop a ship’s station bill for your ship and review it with an adult leader

Ordinary 10b-Magnetic Variation.pdf

Ordinary 10b. Degree system of compass direction.

Explain the degree system of compass direction. Explain variation and deviation and how they are used to

convert between true headings and bearings to compass headings and bearings.

6b. Sea Scout Apprentice & Ordinary knots.

LCDR Wayne Stacey, USCG (ret.) demonstrates how to tie Sea Scout Apprentice and ordinary knots.

Coast Guard Auxiliary Sea Scout - AuxScout



Anchoring requires understanding Ground Tackle. This webinar will include selected elements from Ordinary and Able Ground Tackle Requirements, to empower Sea Scouts to understand how to anchor a vessel. The webinar will include: Name the parts of a stock anchor and a stockless anchor. (Ordinary 8(a)); Describe five types of anchors. Describe how each type holds the bottom, the kind of bottom in which it holds best, and the advantages or disadvantages of each type. (Ordinary 8(b)); Identify the parts of the anchor cable starting with the anchor and ending at the vessel. (Able 8(b)); Identify a capstan or windlass and explain its use in handling line, wire rope, or chain. (Able 8(e)).



Ordinary 9. Navigation Rules FAQ

The new “Navigation Rules FAQ” video answers the most frequently asked questions regarding Nav Rules for recreational boaters. Viewers will learn about the US Aids to Navigation System (ATONS), right-of-way, look-outs, wake effects, lights, and related regulations. Also featured is information about how to obtain print and electronic copies of the Nav Rules. Learn more at bit.ly/2c9b2OM. Join USPS at bit.ly/2bQX2KS.

Ordinary 9. Rules of the Road (Part 1)

Recorded on 06/15/2020 - The Navigation Rules are the "Rules of the Road" for all mariners. Join Skipper Max Rosenberg, a two-time graduate of the California Maritime Academy, who has spent nearly 10 years sailing as a Chief Engineer on tugboats, for this two-part webinar series on the Rules of the Road. Part 1 will cover: Explain the purpose of Navigation Rules, International and Inland. (Ordinary 9(a)) Know the general “Rule of Responsibility.” (Ordinary 9(b)) Define stand-on and give-way vessels for the following situations: meeting, crossing, and overtaking for both power and sailing vessels. (Ordinary 9(c)) Explain “Responsibility Between Vessels” (vessel priority). (Ordinary 9(d))

Ordinary 9. Rules of the Road (Part 2)

Recorded on 06/15/2020 - The Navigation Rules are the "Rules of the Road" for all mariners. Join Skipper Max Rosenberg, a two-time graduate of the California Maritime Academy, who has spent nearly 10 years sailing as a Chief Engineer on tugboats, for this two-part webinar series on the Rules of the Road. Part 1 will cover: Explain the purpose of Navigation Rules, International and Inland. (Ordinary 9(a)) Know the general “Rule of Responsibility.” (Ordinary 9(b)) Define stand-on and give-way vessels for the following situations: meeting, crossing, and overtaking for both power and sailing vessels. (Ordinary 9(c)) Explain “Responsibility Between Vessels” (vessel priority). (Ordinary 9(d))

Ordinary 9 e & f. Navigation Lights and Sound Signals

The Navigation Rules are the "Rules of the Road" for all mariners. Join Skipper Max Rosenberg, a two-time graduate of the California Maritime Academy, who has spent nearly 10 years sailing as a Chief Engineer on tugboats, for this two-part webinar series on the Rules of the Road. Part 2 will cover Ordinary Requirements (e) and (f): e. Explain the navigation lights required for power-driven and sailing vessels underway. Explain what is required for a vessel under oars. Describe the lighting requirements for paddlecraft. Explain why carrying a sound-producing device, such as a whistle, is important when operating a paddlecraft. f. Describe the sound signals for maneuvering, warning, and restricted visibility.



ORD PILOTING AND NAVIGATION 10.b, Measuring Courses and Bearings.mp4

Ordinary 10b. Compass headings and bearings

It is very important for the safe boater to have multiple methods for safely navigating and piloting. Electronic navigation is the primary method used by professional and recreational boaters, but it is important to be able to navigate using traditional or paper methods in case the electronics fail and to be able to verify that the electronics are giving accurate information. Electronic systems have failures (Ever had a dropped call on a cell phone?), and it is important to be able to navigate without them. #SeaScoutShip1701

Ordinary 11b. Duties of a Lookout

Explain the duties of a lookout and demonstrate how to report objects in view and wind directions with respect to the vessel.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1VLc5FvpW4ORmg7yGTetPX8ezCLRtkbw5



Ordinary 12a. Environment. Federal Water Pollution Act.

a. Discuss with an adult leader the Federal Water Pollution Control Act as related to oil discharges. Explain what a “Discharge of Oil Prohibited” placard is and if applicable find it aboard your ship’s vessels.

Ordinary 12b. Environment. Aquatic nuisance species.

b. Explain what aquatic nuisance species are and how you can help stop their spread.

Ordinary 13. Weather

Read and understand a local weather bulletin. Know how to obtain current marine and weather reports from the National Weather Service in your area by telephone or radio, or online.

drive.google.com/open?id=1gO_a85FQ-2xAnlLgJBT_x4_otMwhMTeY

Ordinary 13. Weather. Coast Guard Tech Talks

The first Coast Guard Tech Talks webinar with our partners in the Coast Guard Auxiliary covering Weather, Ordinary Requirement 13 and Able Requirement 13.

https://www.facebook.com/SeaScoutsBSA/videos/236319774331382/